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Posted by Fenru who has 322 posts.

Wolves, Plots & Writing

Welcome to English 220: Writing Fiction! This is a three-month course, worth two full English college credits; here's your syllabus.

Juuust kidding! Fast-forward, rewind, play.

Welcome to "Wolves, Plots, & Writing," an extension of RoW's roleplaying guide; a basic 4-element guide for characters (who they are and what they do), plots (making characters do and think things things), and everything else in-between, including exclusive Relic Lore-specific information.

Writing is what we do here on RoW and, heck, we’re darn proud of it! It’s stress-relief, fun, and a social event all-in-one. The thing is, when a player starts out here in Relic Lore, their character - created or adopted - does too (with the exception of RoW’s site-born litters, but sometimes even they need a place to start!). So, without further ado, onto the writing tips and how to get in touch with your inner writer!

Also, just in case you're here because of the very much dreaded Writer's Block (dun dun DUN!), please skim through his article (in case you're able to pinpoint why your character "feels stuck") before checking out how to deal with it and check out further resources.

(This post was last modified: Jul 06, 2018, 06:57 PM by Sahalie.)
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#1
Posted by Mapplethorpe who has 258 posts.

Plots

Firstly, I'll make this clear: Plots ≠ Character. Yes, plots do not equal character. And, yes, characters = action, but actions are not what truly make a plot. Characters in these stories are protagonists - the main/central character of their story. Plots consist of stories, stakes and tension-building (which we'll get to here in a bit), and the development of one's character - your wolf. Before we get to the types of plots, let me introduce you to the essential tidbit to keep in mind when making a plot: Chekhov's Gun.

Chekhov’s Gun.

The concept of Chekhov’s Gun is actually a simple one:

“One must not put a loaded rifle on the stage if no one is thinking of firing it.”

This means: 1.) Drop hints to the reader or, at the very least, let them know ahead of time that something [bad or good!] is going to happen, 2.) Promises made had better pay off and be in-line with the stakes and level of danger the writer has hinted at.

TIP!
Ruins of Wildwood is a realistic wolf RP and operates in real-time date-wise. To help keep your timelines in order, always write your character progressively and only backdate threads when it is absolutely necessary.

Pick a plot, any plot. Jus' make it a good one...

Plots come in seven different, basic varieties. By definition, they are meaningful ways the writer has arranged and organized the actions (a character's actions) of a story.

  • Overcoming the Monster — (ie. King Kong, Dracula, Anne Rice's Lestat de Lioncourt, Theseus and the Minotaur, Little Red Riding Hood)
    • Characters participating in a plot of this nature, frankly, battle to overcome a problem in the form of another character (more than likely an antagonist, a character who is the anti-protagonist).

  • Rags to Riches — (ie. Annie, Cinderella, Rocky)
    • Characters constantly battle dark or wholly taxing elements (emotions, opponents, circumstances) to eventually emerge into the light where all can see them for what and who they are.

  • The Quest — (ie. Homer's Odyssey, Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark, Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief)
    • A call is issued to the character which {sometimes} requires them to obtain a companion/companions to complete a mission or journey.
    • These plots are generally chock-full of challenges: temptations, monsters, deadly antagonists and forces, helpers and opportunities of obtaining aid of some kind, and final ordeals or ultimatums.
    • Plots of this kind might sometimes have a character travel "to hell" or even "to heaven," pushing them beyond their physical and mental states just to obtain what it is they have sought.

  • Voyage & Return — (ie. The Wizard of Oz, Alice in Wonderland, Silent Hill, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Moby-Dick, The Devil Wears Prada)
    • Characters have completed a "Quest plot-line" and must now "return home," possibly with a deeper understanding of both the worlds they have discovered and left behind and a better understanding of who they really are.
    • Characters are transported to "another world," an unfamiliar place in Relic Lore or a dream-like setting.

  • Comedy — (ie. Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, Tommy Boy, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice)
    • Plots bring the character through a process of confusion followed by recognition.
    • Characters transform from dark (ie. moody, tragic, angered, sad, troubled, irate) to light (cheerful, happy, light-hearted, comical).
    • Comedies seem jovial, light, and almost effortless, but a dark force is keeping the hero and heroine apart, which often results in a cascade of additional romantic entanglements keeping more minor characters from finding their own happiness. As the story progresses, the obstacle for the main lovers is removed (a parent or guardian relents, a misunderstanding created by the dark force is cleared up, etc.) and the chain of complications swings into motion the other direction until all the relationships result in happy endings.
    • Usually, all characters in a Comedy plot are brought to light and reconciled with.

  • Tragedy — (ie. Shakespeare's Hamlet, Requiem for a Dream, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Anna Karenina)
    • Tragedies are commonly what bring a character to their demise or ultimate downfall. Please use this type of plot wisely!
      • I. Anticipation - character expects something...
      • II. "Dream" Stage - character becomes committed to the course of action to obtain "that something," often undergoing an event likened to "making a deal with the Devil."
      • III. "Frustration" Stage - things start to go subtly wrong...
      • IV. "Nightmare" Stage - character suffers from total loss of control.
      • V. "Destruction/Death Wish" Stage - character meets their death or is driven to destroy themselves.

  • Rebirth — (ie. A Tale of Two Cities, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, A Christmas Carol, The Secret Garden)
    • Character is redeemed by another character, typically a "hero" being saved by a "heroine" or vice versa.
      1. Young hero/heroine falls under the shadow of a dark power.
      2. Everything in their lives actually seem to be going well as trouble seems to recede from their lives.
      3. Darkness approaches again; character is imprisoned in a state of living death.
      4. Character continues on for a long period of time; at this point, it would seem as though the dark power has triumphed over them and all they know.
      5. Miraculous redemption via another character.
(This post was last modified: Oct 14, 2015, 04:55 AM by Rook.)
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#2
Posted by Fenru who has 322 posts.

Getting to know your Character

With all the different types of events that your wolf could possibly live through and survive (or not...) out of the way, let's pose the most important question:

Who is the wolf behind the name that I've registered on Ruins of Wildwood?

Well, let us find out!

Enter the wolf

Your wolf has just entered Relic Lore... so, now what? We'll use the Elements of Fiction to help define these identities that we Relic Lore writers would love to bring to life:

  1. Character
    • Your wolf is what and who drives plots forward.
    • The more unique and original they are, THE BETTER!
    • One can only understand a character by what a character does (action).
    • In order for a character to be believable, his/her actions must be believable.
    • Round Characters vs. Flat Characters (read here on how to avoid making your character "flat"!)
      • Round: fully realized, developed, three-dimensional character.
      • Flat: summarized traits, background, works like a minor character or someone like an extra in a movie.
    • Who are they?
      • Protagonist: the main/central character
      • Antagonist: the opponent/opposite of a protagonist character
      • Foil: "a sidekick" who might be the protagonist of their own story, but helps to better define and understand a protagonist character (these are often written as a contrast, not an opponent, to a protagonist. Think of "Robin" from Batman & Robin or "Samwise Gamgee" from Lord of the Rings).
  2. Plot
    • A plot = what a character does...
  3. Theme
    • Themes are the "meaning" of a character's story, not its topic. (ie. A theme in Borden's storyline{s} relate to those found in the 2006 movie The Prestige. In following the theme in a magician's show, elements in Borden's life both appear and disappear, allowing him to truly treasure what he has and yearn for what he does not have.)
    • The writer's "vision of life" - their ideas on how their character acts, reacts, behaves, and lives - is critical to defining a theme.
  4. Point of View
    • Here on Ruins of Wildwood, we write in third person (ie. "The wolf howled" vs. "You howled." {Second person} and "I howled." {First person}).
    • Third person allows writers to write in three different styles:
      • Limited Omniscient: The writer shows the reader what their character is doing and tells what their character is thinking. Readers do not know what will happen to the characters or what the characters are thinking.
      • Omniscient: The writer allows readers into their character's head to hear their thoughts.
      • Objective: The writer only shows character's actions that can imply thinking but cannot tell reader what the character is thinking.
  5. Setting
    • There are three types of settings that relate to your wolf:
      • Physical - what they are and where they are from.
      • Emotional - who they are, what they believe, and what they feel.
      • Chronological - how things happened to your character in relation to stages or chapters of their life story.

Here's a thought:
"You see a guy on a good day and you don't really know him. It's the bad days that reveal who people really are."

-- Mack Brown, Texas Head Coach

(This post was last modified: Jul 04, 2014, 07:02 PM by Angier.)
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#3
Posted by Mapplethorpe who has 258 posts.

Images (and mentally exploring Relic Lore)

Images are a role-player’s bread and butter. These structured words are actually what create, build, and define the realm of Relic Lore; they transport not only yourself but your character, other characters and their players, as well as readers to another place by mentally seeing and experiencing it. Simply put, reading is “image viewing,” and everyone views pictures differently, but specific details and precise descriptions breathe life into this fictional, realistic part of Canada.

Images are active, meaning the subject of the sentence is performing the action:

PassiveHis hopes and plans had fallen through because he was not accepted by the pack Leader.
ActiveThe young rogue angrily growled at the high-ranking wolf's disapproving glare.
Often, the reader is there on the scene in the thread, not being told about the story, but experiencing it alongside the/their characters.

Thoughts vs. Images:

Polar Opposites — Thoughts are non-pictoral mental activity. Images describe what is physically happening.
Thought Being under the willow made him feel trapped.
ImageAngier eyed the crooked boughs above him, the falling strands of blossoms created the most convenient type of shade. The verdant curtain enclosed him within a canopy that shielded him from the hot summer sun. For a moment, despite the pleasant surroundings, he felt like he might have walked into a trap with the whip-like branches forming an inescapable cage around him.

TIP!
Keep thoughts to a minimum when writing. Overwriting thoughts traps readers in characters’ heads and underwriting images does not fully extend what is happening around the character.

How to generate images.

Ground Yourself — Establish space and time. This doesn't have to be particularly specific (usually time of day and weather conditions are enough to begin with) but it helps with laying out the thread setting.
Create the Setting — Render specific details (namely where your character is and what they are doing if they are interacting with their environment) to help anchor your character in time and space.
Use the Basics — Images are actually not purely visual! Activate all senses - see, smell, hear, touch, and even "imagining" senses (thinking they've seen, smelled, heard, or touched something that isn't or wasn't really there).
Focus — Concentrate on two things: Characters and actions.
Use Specifics
  • Utilize concrete nouns, place names, proper nouns, and active verbs.
  • Specific over general (ie. “five blackberries” vs. “fruit")
  • Sharpen views to intensify images; create focus and draw the reader's/character's eye to particular parts of the scene.
Move around within posts
  • Zoom in/out (call attention to details, both big and small.)
  • Pan (survey the surroundings and territory the thread has been posted in.)
  • Widen (include details that could be seen from a distance, landmarks and notable elements...)
  • Leave the initial setting (explore the area! Those subterritories can be pretty roomy!)
  • Change distance between camera and subject(s)

TIP!
Layer dialogue with action to make responses and starter posts interesting.

Be Specific.

Don’t Generalize — Unless it is absolutely necessary to be vague (which happens quite often with liquid time settings), don’t generalize! “General” words and summarizing kills tension.
Write from a Close-up View — Bring your readers/other players and their characters to exact moments in time and space to further immerse them in the thread. Focus on parts of the character that might go unnoticed (ie. their nostrils flared or their elbows submerged underwater as they waded further into the Lagoon); feature bits of scenery to highlight the time of day and weather conditions (ie. falling snowflakes as large as acorns or a summer day sun so scorching it was no more that a white dot in the sky above).
Closeness, NOT Distance — When possible, write within the experience, do not just observe. Keep your audience on the scene.
Utilize Synonyms! — Rather than just using "he," "she" and your character's name, add some flavor to your writing by using "like terms" and synonyms. Think of other ways to present your character and those they interact with; use adjectives and titles, even nicknames if they have them. (ie. Fenru's mother, masked man, naive woman, golden prince, rogue, blue-eyed Guard, Nomad, River wolf, ivory queen, rebel, Leader of the Secret Woodlands, the red preacher, the ginger saint, Lyall patriarch, white lady, beggar, Advisor, Hunter, subordinate...)
(This post was last modified: Jan 04, 2014, 02:26 AM by Angier.)
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#4
Posted by Fenru who has 322 posts.

Insight, Accuracy, Generosity & Question

These next four elements also help with fleshing out one's character, particularly their inner-workings, and how they experience Relic Lore from an emotional perspective, which will allow character growth and development.

Insight

Insight is a careful, specific observation into the behavior or action of a character. This allows:

  • the reader to come to their own conclusions.
  • the writer to explain things that might not be seen or heard.
  • other characters to provide wisdom and ask more questions.

Practiced writers are capable of going back over their work and finding places where insight might naturally occur. They let their characters "discover" insight...

TIP!
Always keep searching for new ways of looking at a topic or object. (ie. For example, how many ways can you look at a wolf? From the top, bottom, right side, left side, zoom in, zoom out, as a silhouette, as a reflection...)

Accuracy

In regards to Insight, it does not have to be deep, but it has to be exactly right.

As a writer, focus on:

  1. Characters (yours and theirs)
    • Gestures
    • Dialogue/Tone/Voice
  2. Actions/Reactions
    • How do others cause your wolf to behave differently?

Generosity

Create Experiences for your readers to have with your character, not for them to hear about.
Create a pattern of insight and let both characters and readers solve and discover Relic Lore through the character's own eyes.
Be Generous with characters. Allow them good traits as well as flaws. Without one or the other, or too little of either traits or flaws, a wolf might not "feel" or be well-rounded as a written character.

Question

Questions simply lead both characters and readers to the truth. Let your posts pose small, pointed questions (ie. What might happen if my puppy character chooses not to continue his bloodline when he comes of age? or What would happen if my character chose to disobey their Leader's rules? or What would happen if Elettra Archer could never take up a male Leader as a mate? or What if Fenru openly acknowledged Ice Aesir as a/his "Dad" instead of calling him "Ice?").

TIP!
If you have no more ideas for plots or how to develop your character, ask questions! Keep asking them "What would happen if...?"

(This post was last modified: Jun 17, 2013, 03:19 AM by Mapplethorpe.)
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#5
Posted by Mapplethorpe who has 258 posts.

Tension (no danger = no tension)

Tension is another important part of writing. It drives your character to develop and urges them to act in order to get what they want or suffer the consequences for falling through. Desire and Danger must both be present in the situation to get the full effect of tension. Also take into account that Relic Lore's setting is in remote wilderness; characters are often required to hone and act upon basic instincts and their most primal needs.

Desire + Danger/Opposition = Tension
Tension = "upping the stakes"

Tension is manifested two ways:

External/Physical — actions which try to achieve the desire.
Internal/Thoughts — thoughts about the significance of the desire/conflicts.

TIP!
When working with one or two other characters in a plot, it helps to have them take sides to heighten "drama." Matching them as opponents or having the pair/group side against other equal elements in a power struggle creates tension.

4 Elements of Tension.

Problem — Your character wants something specific (a rank, a mate, their own pack, a family, a pack role, etc.).
Obstacles — These can be anything – other characters or wolves, forces (ie. pack morals, emotions, their own moral codes), nature, luck, war, famine, etc.
Desire — Define what it is your wolf strongly wants and absolutely must have.
Stakes — What your character wants must matter to them greatly, perhaps so great that they may succumb to consequences (demotion, exile, estrangement, death, etc.) should they not succeed in obtaining their desire or goal.

For example (following a "Quest" plot storyline):
After Borden Lyall unexpectedly leaves his pack to search for his missing son, Prosper, he returns home to Grizzly Hollow after several months of traveling to discover that he has been replaced by what seems like a younger suitor - Kade Attaya. In order for Borden to reclaim his place as Leader beside his mate, Jaysyek, he must first regain her trust and promise that he would never leave her again. He must also assess his current mindset and accompanying emotions in light of the new pack situation. Then, in correlation to RoW's Fight system, he must work his way up the hierarchy after being initiated back as the Lowest of the pack. Along the way in trying to obtain his goal to win back his position, he might be able to acquire the support he needs from the opponents he successfully overtakes in rank. If he does not succeed, he risks losing his chance to father another litter with Jaysyek as well as her respect for proving that he was still the man she had fallen in love with. In addition, he is subject to exile under the new patriarch's reign and may even consider life as a lone wolf if he cannot emotionally face his fate living as a subordinate in the pack he had originally established.

Don’t be afraid to vary the tension! Instead of having things get progressively worse or better, create a series of shifting ups and downs to give your characters dynamic.

Manipulating Tension.

Create Oppositions — Either allow setting and action to clash, or create exterior visual oppositions. (“Give the good guy flaws, and give the bad guy likable traits.”)
Eliminate Perfect Equals — Whenever two characters are equally matched in a dilemma, add a third character to help “unbalance” them.
Layers — Adding dimensions to plots, threads, and posts create meaning. Use “alive” images and give them more depth by layering specific and contrasting images onto them.
Dialogue + Action — Layering dialogue and action also creates depth and meaning. This helps characters express themselves and drive their points across to others.
Variations — Vary the way characters are represented (ie. direct speech, physical state, mental state). This will add new actions and the possibility of new IC events.
Add Facades
  • Have inner elements (thoughts, emotions) create tension with outer elements (reality, physical existence).
  • Create “false fronts.” This will add a new “level” to your character and present new ways for them to achieve OOC goals IC-ly.
  • Use dialogue to contradict character’s desires rather than straight-out announce them.

When your character gets what they want, the piece/story-arc is over - the tension is resolved.

TIP!
Keep creating new needs and wants; this will keep your character moving forward and will help them grow as an individual. Thus allowing characters to continue to “open up” and “make themselves easier to write out.” Have the meeting of one need create a new one.

(This post was last modified: Aug 11, 2013, 11:30 PM by Fenru.)
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#6
Posted by Fenru who has 322 posts.

Dealing with Writer's Block

Writer's block. It happens from time to time and there's nothing wrong with being burdened, confronted, held back, and/or stopped by it. In this section you will find a few things to help battle it and come to terms with it, along with a few outside resources.

First things first.

  1. Don't Worry About It! It happens; and, sometimes, the muse for certain characters just aren't there (or real-life things have become an absolute priority). Don't beat yourself up and don't gripe. It even befalls the greatest of writers - even J.K. Rowling when she was writing Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets!

  2. Don't Stop Writing. One way to try and conquer one's writer's block is to, simply, write! Just write. It doesn't have to be the best starter, reply, or post ever but in starting somewhere again might prove to be helpful in rediscovering a character's muse. Also, don't ever think that you'll never write again; don't lose hope!

  3. Get Away From It, ALL of It. From time to time, there might come a moment where one's head might just be too focused on Relic Lore or the world in which their character has so readily settled into. You can either reassess your character (ASK what your wolf wants and desires, tweak a standing plot by manipulating the tension, take the Online D&D Alignment test and check out the 9 Character Alignments, read up on how to Immerse your Character, consider putting your character to the test with one of the seven plots, or ask for help or suggestions in the Grab a Plot! board.) or make a clean break and step away from the forums for even just a little while. Do something else you enjoy, you might find that your muse(s) might come back to you when you are happier and a little more carefree about advancing current threads or plots.

A Short-List on What to Do Instead...

  • DON'T think about NOT writing.
  • Listen to music, watch a movie, read a book, play a game, work on or start a new project, do another hobby... Do other "favorite things" that make you happy.
  • Spend quality time with your pet (y'never know when your beloved companion might do something that your character just might have to imitate...).
  • Hang out in the chatbox for a conversation or two (we'd love to have you!).
  • Have a conversation with your character in your head and figure out what might be going on in their inner-workings.
  • Make a "character tumblr." (Join us: Datura Aquila, Maksim Baranski, Naira Aquila, Sköll Archer.)
  • Do some Weekly Exercises provided by The Library of Trees on tumblr.
  • Browse through the Relic Lore archives or finished threads around the site in search of inspiration.
  • If your character is based on another fictional character or likened to an actor or actress, watch some of their films or read their books and draw inspiration from them (think of certain tics, mannerisms, the type of plot their story or movie is based upon, etc...).
  • Plan on writing, sometimes all it takes is to think about or set aside the time to write and full immerse oneself into a thread.
  • Check out the Ruins of Wildwood tumblr.
  • Get some fresh air.

Writer's Block Resources.

(This post was last modified: Jan 04, 2014, 02:45 AM by Angier.)
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#7
Posted by Fenru who has 322 posts.

What not to do...

As a general guideline for writers, here are five simple things that, if avoided, will help you and your character's experiences here on Ruins of Wildwood bring enjoyment for participants and readers alike:

  1. do not preach to your readers.
  2. do not use overly poetic or writerly prose.
  3. do not spell everything out.
  4. do not let your character off the hook!
  5. do not fear that you have nothing to say!

Reply
#8
Posted by Angier who has 439 posts.

Handy-Dandy Resources.

  • Weather on RoW — Quick lil' table of when each season starts and ends, the general temperature and weather conditions.
  • Regions in Relic Lore — Traveling or exploring? Make sure to note that characters have time to travel in-between threads!
  • Subterritories of Relic Lore — A list of descriptions and a photo of Relic Lore's subterritories.
  • Flora & Fauna Guide — A list of plants and animals native to Relic Lore.
  • WordCounter.net — A site that helps ensure your posts reach the 250 word minimum.
  • Synonyms for "Said" — Why "say" something when your wolf can howl, growl, and yowl it?


Synonyms for Colors
RedOrangeYellowGreenBluePurple
Auburn
Blood red
Cardinal red
Carmine
Crimson
Garnet
Maroon
Raspberry
Ruby
Rust
Scarlet
Vermillion

Amber
Apricot
Carrot
Citrine
Copper
Fiery
Fulvous
Gamboge
Peach
Pumpkin
Tangerine


Aureolin
Blond
Cadmium yellow
Citrine
Daffodil
Flaxen
Gold
Goldenrod
Mustard
Saffron
Sunglow
Sun-kissed
Straw
Apple green
Emerald
Forest green
Jade
Minty
Olive
Pistachio
Shamrock green
Spring green
Teal
Verdant
Virescent

Azure
Cerulean
Cyan
Glaucous
Icy blue
Powder blue
Sapphire
Sea green
Steel blue
Turquoise
Ultramarine
Zaffre

Amethyst
Eggplant
Fuschia
Hawthorn berry
Indigo
Iris
Lavender
Lilac
Mauve
Plum
Thistle
Violet
Wisteria
PinkGreyBlackWhiteBrown
Amaranth
Blush
Carnation pink
Cerise
Coral
Magenta
Puce
Rose
Salmon




Charcoal
Gunmetal
Grizzled
Hoary
Metallic
Midnight
Silver
Slate gray
Sooty
Taupe gray
Timberwolf gray


Coal
Dark
Dusky
Ebony
Inky
Pitch-black
Sable
Shadowy
Swarthy




Ashen
Chalky
Colorless
Cream
Fair
Ghost white
Ivory
Magnolia
Pale
Pallid
Snowy


Beige
Bronze
Bole
Buff
Burnt sienna
Camel
Caramel
Chestnut
Chocolate
Cocoa-brown
Coffee
Ecru
Fallow
Fawn
Khaki
Liver
Mahogany
Nut-brown
Ochre
Russet
Sand
Sepia
Sienna
Tan
Tawny
Umber

How to Describe Scents
Words to Descibe "Scent"
acidic / acidy
acrid
airy
ambrosial
anosmic (odorless)
antiseptic
appealing
aroma / aromatic
balmy
balsamic
biting
bitter
bittersweet
bland
bouquet
breath
briny
burning / burnt
camphoric
caustic
cedar
choking
citrusy
clean
clear
cloying
comforting
cool
crisp
crude
damp
dank
decaying
delicate
delicious
dirty
distinctive
earthy
elemental
elusive
emanation
essence
faint
far-reaching
fetid
fine
fishy
floral / flowery
fragrance
fragrant
fresh
fruity
fulsome
fume
funky
fusty
gamy
goaty
harsh
heady
heavy
herbal
honeysuckle
incense
intoxicating
lavender
lemony
lilac
luscious
malodorous
medicinal
metallic
mildewed
minty
moist
moldy
mossy
muscadine
musk / musky
musty
muted
myrrh
nasty
nauseating
nose-tickling
noxious
odor
odoriferous
odorless
oppressive
organic
overpowering
penetrating
peppery
perfume / perfumed
pine / piney
piquant
pleasing
polluted
potpourri
pungent
pure
putrescent
putrid
rancid
rank
raw
redolence / redolent
reek / reeking
refreshing
ripe
rotten / rotting
salty
sandalwood
satisfying
savory
scent / scented
sensual
sharp
sickly / sickening
skunky
smelly
smoky
soiled
sour
spicy
spoiled
spring-fresh
squalid
stagnant
stale
stench
stifling
stinging
stink
stinky / stinking
strong
stuffy
subtle
suffocating
sugary
sulfuric
sweaty
sweet / sweetness
taint / tainted
tang / tangy
tantalizing
tart
tempting
tonic
unappealing
unscented
warm
whiff
woody
yeasty
zesty





Synonyms for "Scent"
fragrance, smell, aroma, aura, balm, bouquet, essence, fragrance, incense, odorize, perfume, pheromone, redolence, stench, stink, reek, whiff

Words to Describe a Character's Voice (Source)

  • adenoidal: if someone’s voice is adenoidal, some of the sound seems to come through their nose.
  • appealing: an appealing look, voice etc shows that you want help, approval, or agreement.
  • breathy: with loud breathing noises.
  • brittle: if you speak in a brittle voice, you sound as if you are about to cry.
  • croaky: if someone’s voice sounds croaky, they speak in a low rough voice that sounds as if they have a sore throat.
  • dead: if someone’s eyes are dead, or if their voice is dead, they feel or show no emotion.
  • disembodied: a disembodied voice comes from someone who you cannot see
  • flat: spoken in a voice that does not go up and down. This word is often used for describing the speech of people from a particular region.
  • fruity: a fruity voice or laugh is deep and strong in a pleasant way.
  • grating: a grating voice, laugh, or sound is unpleasant and annoying.
  • gravelly: a gravelly voice sounds low and rough.
  • gruff: a gruff voice has a rough low sound.
  • guttural: a guttural sound is deep and made at the back of your throat.
  • high-pitched: a high-pitched voice or sound is very high.
  • hoarse: someone who is hoarse or has a hoarse voice speaks in a low rough voice, usually because their throat is sore.
  • honeyed: honeyed words or a honeyed voice sound very nice but you cannot trust the person who is speaking.
  • husky: a husky voice is deep and sounds hoarse (as if you have a sore throat), often in an attractive way.
  • low (adjective): a low voice or sound is quiet and difficult to hear.
  • low (adverb): in a deep voice, or with a deep sound.
  • matter-of-fact: used about someone’s behaviour or voice.
  • modulated: a modulated voice is controlled and pleasant to listen to.
  • monotonous: a monotonous sound or voice is boring and unpleasant because it does not change in loudness or become higher or lower.
  • nasal: someone with a nasal voice sounds as if they are speaking through their nose.
  • orotund: an orotund voice is loud and clear
  • penetrating: a penetrating voice or sound is so high or loud that it makes you slightly uncomfortable.
  • plummy: a plummy voice or way of speaking is considered to be typical of an English person of a high social class. This word shows that you dislike people who speak like this.
  • quietly: in a quiet voice.
  • raucous: a raucous voice or noise is loud and sounds rough.
  • ringing: a ringing sound or voice is very loud and clear.
  • rough: a rough voice is not soft and is unpleasant to listen to.
  • shrill: a shrill noise or voice is very loud, high, and unpleasant.
  • silvery: a silvery voice or sound is clear, light, and pleasant.
  • singsong: if you speak in a singsong voice, your voice rises and falls in a musical way.
  • small: a small voice or sound is quiet.
  • smoky: a smoky voice or smoky eyes are sexually attractive in a slightly mysterious way.
  • softly spoken: someone who is softly spoken has a quiet gentle voice.
  • sotto voce (adjective, adverb): in a very quiet voice.stentorian: a stentorian voice sounds very loud and severe.
  • strangled: a strangled sound is one that someone stops before they finish making it.
  • strangulated: strangled (see above).
  • strident: a strident voice or sound is loud and unpleasant.
  • taut: used about something such as a voice or expression that shows someone is nervous or angry.
  • thick: if your voice is thick with an emotion, it sounds less clear than usual because of the emotion.
  • thickly: with a low voice that comes mostly from your throat.
  • thin: a thin voice or sound is high and unpleasant to listen to.
  • throaty: a throaty sound is low and seems to come from deep in your throat.
  • tight: a tight voice or expression shows that you are nervous or annoyed.
  • toneless: a toneless voice does not express any emotion.
  • tremulous: if something such as your voice or smile is tremulous, it is not steady, for example because you are afraid or excited.
  • wheezy: a wheezy noise sounds as if it is made by someone who has difficulty breathing.
  • wobbly: if your voice is wobbly, it goes up and down, usually because you are frightened, not confident, or are going to cry.

(This post was last modified: May 09, 2014, 10:35 PM by Angier.)
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